9 reasons to visit Mawlynnong , a tiny Khasi Village

Travel
by Tandrima Chattopadhyay
26 Oct 2017

9 reasons to visit Mawlynnong, a tiny Khasi Village


                                                                    

I found this name -Mawlynnong- in a blog first while researching on the places to see in Meghalaya before our trip to the North-East India last time.  This name is quite common  to the interested tourists nowadays as it was awarded as the cleanest village of Asia in 2003 by Discover India Magazine. Yes, it is a very clean village and the villagers are keen to maintain it though it is a very small village with more or less 500 inhabitants.

We started for Mawlynnong after our visit to the Sacred Wood at Mawphalang and reached there almost at 8 pm…which is really late for such a remote place. Here you will find only home stays (A list will be provided with for interested travellers.).The owner of our homestay handed over the keys of our hut and hurried to his home , actually to his ‘ wife’s home’ he said proudly as they belong to a matriarchal society.

1.      Small Home Stays with small gardens

                                                                            

Mawlynnong has a number of small but well-equipped home-stays. You can choose any one from the list and can contact the given phone numbers to have a look of the home-stay through WhatsApp.  home stays mawlynnong.docx—click here to get a list of the home stays at Mawlynnong.

2.      Khasi restaurant with fresh and tasty food

                                                                                

There is a very good restaurant at the centre of the village, Dapbiang Restaurant which has a good variety of veg and non-veg dishes available but order should be placed early as there is a rush in the peak seasons. We had piping hot chicken curry and tawa roti there and came back at our hut to sleep listening to the rhythm of the falling rain against thatched roof of our hut.

3.      Sky-Walk

                                                                                        

Next morning was as fresh as a morning glory. After tea, we managed one umbrella and started our walk around the village. A sign-board on the road showed “Bangladesh View Point” and we followed the path. We reached at a tree-walk made with bamboo and strong roots of trees.

                                                                                     

Mounting to the top of the walk , a vast green land was stretched before us leading our eyes to the vista of our neighbouring country ,Bangladesh.

4.      Insect-eating plant

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
As it started to drizzle, we took resort to Ha La Rympei  tea stall. The owner treated us with tea with milk and sugar and biscuits and I must say the tea was good. Ha La Rympei is one of the best home stays here and it harbours a wonder for the tourists---a pitcher plant in front of its gate. I never see any of its kind before. As a Bengali I felt nostalgic here as it reminded me of a wonderful story of Satyajit Ray— ‘Septopus er khide”( Hunger of Septopus) : it tells how an insect eating plant has become a ferocious cannibal.

5.      Picturesque Church

Peace with the elernal father –the Churches of Epiphany is a picturesque church in this calm and quiet village. It is under the Diocese of North East India, founded in 1902. A morning school for children is housed here.

                                                                                

Another Church was under renovation, probably a Catholic Church.

6.      Balancing rock and others

                                                                                                                    


The bounty of fresh oxygen, simple smiling people, fruits and flowers, balancing rock ---all add to the serene natural beauty of Mawlynnong.

 

7.      Buy a small token for your love

                                                                                    

     

An hour or two walk will give you a full picture of this village, then have a heavy breakfast at Dapbiang, buy a few souvenir from the shops at the centre of the village and head towards the Living Root Bridge, another wonder of this place.

8.      Living root bridge

                                                                                    


Living Root Bridge at Mawlynnong – From the memorial stone here, I came to know that this bridge is made weaving the roots of rubber plants by the Khasi people of the Nohwet village. Similar bridges can be seen in Cherrapunji and some other parts of Meghalaya. It is a significant innovation of the Khasi tribe and a thing of wonder. This bridge is 30 metre long. In 1840 rubber plants were planted on the both sides of river Thyllang at Nohwet village with the purpose of weaving this eco-friendly bridge.

9.      Fresh and juicy pineapple

It is quite hot here from May to September. To quench thirst, you will get lot of fruit shops here. I would suggest to taste the pieces of pineapple sprinkled with spices, full of sweet juice as sweet as the memory of Mawlynnong can be.

And don't forget to get on the tree house to have an aerial view of this wonderful village.